The Welland-Fosse Benefice: Prayers and Notices.  Sunday 12th July 2020

The Welland-Fosse Benefice: Prayers and Notices.  Sunday 12th July 2020

The Welland-Fosse Benefice: Prayers and Notices.

 Sunday 12th July 2020:  Trinity V

 

  • Please remember in your prayers those who are sick: Bishop John and his wife and Janette Saunders (all with Coronavirus), Barry Broughton, Graham Robinson, Catherine Tanser, David Bradshaw and Derek Barker.
  • We pray also for all those who put their lives in danger to serve others suffering from Coronavirus and for those who have lost their jobs in the crisis.
  • Why not join us via Zoom for Morning Prayer each day at 8.30am – or Compline on Mondays and Wednesdays at 7.30pm? Sunday worship is at 10am, presenting a service with music and brief address.  Join us in the usual way via Simon’s email address, sialey@aol.com
  • “5 More Steps to Kick-start Prayer”?  Go the benefice website: wellandfosse.org
  • Zoom bible studies in St. Mark’s Gospel will continue on Tuesday 14 July at 7.30pm. Please contact Christopher for further details: armstrong60@yahoo.com
  • The Wardens and ministers are working on a plan to re-open our churches gradually for communal worship. It is quite a challenge. Please remember them in your prayers.

 

SOUTH LUFFENHAM

Church is open 10am – 4pm daily for private prayer. 

MORCOTT

The church will open 10am-4pm each Sunday for private prayer. 

Today’s Meditation: Harvesting Gooseberries.

My gooseberry bushes have been laden with fruit this year.  I like to think it was all the effort to prepare the ground in the last few years. Whatever the reason – God knows – the yield is big and, with space in the freezer, I attacked the picking with a rare passion. Well, it produced a vast pile of fruit but the cost, the cost was appalling!  My arms were shredded, with enough thorns to keep my medically-orientated wife busy for ages with her sterilised needle. The sting from the wounds will eventually die down as the smell of the disinfectant disappears.

Sunday’s gospel reading is the Parable of the Sower (Mt. 13).  You know all about it. Simon’s sermon takes an unusual approach: worth reading when it comes around.  It’s a very optimistic story, the way Jesus told it. In spite of all the wasted seed, there is an excellent harvest at the end of it all.

If you read the parable closely – which you probably won’t, now the cricket is back – you will note that Jesus spends a lot of time describing the problems of the poor soil but dismisses the good harvest with the briefest comment.  We too can spend a great deal of time moaning about life – and this pandemic gives us just cause to do that – but take the good things for granted.  I fear that we take our farmers and food producers like that but the reality is quite different.  Yes, the harvest is often excellent but even so, someone has to work hard to make it happen. Time during this lockdown may encourage us to quietly give thanks for all who toil on our behalf.

 

See wellandfosse.org for much more information, including contact details for

The Very Rev Christopher Armstrong and the churchwardens

SERMON FOR SUNDAY 5TH JULY 2020 LIVING WITH SIN

SERMON FOR SUNDAY 5TH JULY 2020 LIVING WITH SIN

Living with Sin.

5 July 2020.

“The good that I would I do not: but the evil which I would not, that I do.”(Romans 7.19. AV)

 

Edward Colston.

The tearing down of statues in the wake of the ‘Black Lives Matter’ movement betrays a very human tension within each of us: the tension between good and bad motives.

I can understand some of the pent-up rage which emanates from those who have been down-trodden for generations. It is an embarrassment which most of us share and these violent scenes have forced us to look carefully at ourselves and our inheritance. Certainly the Church of England has gained much in the past from the slave-trade. All the bishops in the House of Lords voted against the Wilberforce anti-slavery Bill in 1804. But something else, more intimate is also being revealed.

Coulston was obviously a very rich man who, for some reason, gave much of his ill-gotten gains to his home city. This has left the city fathers wringing their hands in the wake of the riots. Bristol Cathedral were quick to respond, planning a purge of memorials. They issued this statement:

                                “For us it is the right moment to take the action we have been

                                 considering for some time. A cathedral or a church should be

                                 a place of sanctuary, justice and peace: a place where God’s glory

                                 is worshipped and God’s love felt.”

This knee-jerk action worries me for inside Coulston and inside all of us lurks this mixture of good and bad motives which we find difficult to control.  Life is not just black and white, Jekyll or Hyde. It is a mixture of both; shades of grey. The inference from Bristol Cathedral suggests that only those who are innocent, good – perfect even – should find sanctuary there and that cannot be right. I would not be welcomed there.

 

St. Paul.

We live in a binary age. It works our computers, so we are told, but it does not help us in perceiving character or doing justice to God’s saving action in Christ. We are all mixtures of good and bad, shades of grey. St. Paul understood that and he explores it in our reading today. He talks here and elsewhere in his work about these opposites of flesh and spirit, law and grace, physical and spiritual yet he knew the reality is more nuanced than that.

Flesh is good; Christ was born in the flesh but flesh can be abused.  Our rapacious appetites get the better of us sometimes.

Law is good. It protects the vulnerable but it can also act as a temptation to go beyond it as any schoolboy scrumper will know.

The physical world is very beautiful but can be hoarded by greedy humanity.

So for Paul, these internal motives of ours are evenly balanced but he sees the answer ‘in Christ’.  It is into Christ that we are baptized; we take on his standards in the life of the Church which is there to keep us and the whole world up to the mark. It recognizes the deceptive nature of sin. Its antidote is clear: turn to Christ.

Living with Sin.

The Jews were given the Law of Moses as a yardstick and Paul lived with that yardstick but he realized that it often failed him. It was a binary world. You either kept the law or failed completely. Paul was once engrossed in it but seeing the violence meted out by Jews to Stephen (Acts 7) he began to change his mind.  His conversation soon followed.

From then on, Paul worked furiously to understand God’s work of salvation through Christ. In this passage, he realizes that baptism doesn’t abolish sin but it does make the path to holiness clearer.

The Jewish law was harsh, heartless. ‘An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.’ Shakespeare in ‘The Merchant of Venice’ illustrates that as Shylock the Jew goes to court to retrieve his pound of flesh. In the court scene, Portia, the disguised lawyer, ridicules Shylock. He can’t get his pound of flesh without spilling blood so is led to recognize that mercy would be the best outcome for all.

Mercy: neither black nor white but the best shade of grey. We so often fail to live up to the standards which Christ lays before us and even our own standards but rewarding the effort, encouraging us when we stumble, picking us up when we fall is what the Christian life is all about.

Acts of mercy, leniency, forgiveness, tolerance lead to grace, where both parties are rewarded, the giver and the receiver.  That is how God deals with us. The author of our hymn today, John Newton, knew that only too well.  He started his career as a slave trader but he also knew life as a slave himself.  During a storm at sea he was converted and mercy for him became a reality.  ‘He came to himself’ and spent the rest of his life supporting Wilberforce and the abolitionists.

God’s Amazing Grace!  It saved a wretch like Newton. How many others does it save? Will Edward Colston be among them? I hope so. Amen.

Sunday Welland-Fosse Benefice: Prayers and Notices. Sunday 4th July

Sunday Welland-Fosse Benefice: Prayers and Notices. Sunday 4th July

 

 Sunday 4th July 2020:  Trinity IV Benefice: Prayers and Notices.

  • Please remember in your prayers those who are sick: Bishop John and his wife and Janette Saunders (all with Coronavirus), Barry Broughton, Graham Robinson, Catherine Tanser, David Bradshaw and Derek Barker.
  • We pray also for all those who put their lives in danger to serve others suffering from Coronavirus and for those who have lost their jobs in the crisis.
  • Why not join us via Zoom for Morning Prayer each day at 8.30am – or Compline on Mondays and Wednesdays at 7.30pm? Sunday worship is at 10am, presenting a service with music and brief address.  Join us in the usual way via Simon’s email address, sialey@aol.com
  • “5 More Steps to Kick-start Prayer”?  Go the benefice website: wellandfosse.org
  • Zoom bible studies in St. Mark’s Gospel will begin on Tuesday 7 July at 7.30pm. Please contact Christopher for further details: armstrong60@yahoo.com
  • The Wardens and ministers are working on a plan to re-open our churches gradually for communal worship. It is quite a challenge. Please remember them in your prayers.

 

SOUTH LUFFENHAM

Church is open 10am – 4pm daily for private prayer. 

MORCOTT

The church will open 10am-4pm each Sunday for private prayer. 

TODAY’S MEDITATION

Super Saturday! I wonder what it will be like? When you read this we will all know what happened on that much awaited day. Perhaps the sun will shine and everyone will enjoy a quiet drink in a country pub, socially distanced. High spirits will be subdued and all will be well.

 

We have seen the crowds at the beach and in beauty spots throughout the country and we are well aware of what crowds are like. Most of us have almost forgotten what it’s like to be with other people in a confined space and are still looking forward to seeing family and friends in the flesh, able to give them a hug. Hopefully that day is on its way.

 

Crowds are part of many areas of life; football matches, theatres, even shopping in the sales! We have had so much solitariness lately but we are still uneasy about being in a crowd and many are afraid to venture out. Churches are now open for private prayer and that is where peace and encouragement may be found. They were closed but God’s work continued.

 

Jesus knew about crowds and about prayer and solitude. The crowds welcomed him to Jerusalem but quickly turned and shouted for his crucifixion. To face what he knew was to come, he prayed in the Garden of Gethsemane on his own. A poster has been prepared for the difficult times we are in which states:

 

Rejoice in hope

Be patient in tribulation

Be constant in prayer

God bless 

 

See wellandfosse.org for much more information, including contact details for

The Very Rev Christopher Armstrong and the churchwardens

READINGS FOR SUNDAY 5TH JULY 2020

READINGS FOR SUNDAY 5TH JULY 2020

Readings for this Sunday the fourth Sunday after Trinity

 

Gen. 24. 34 – 38    Ps. 45 10- end     Rom. 7. 15 – 25 a  Matt. 11. 16 – 19 25 – end

BCP: Gen. 3. 17 – 19  Ps. 79. 8 – 10  rom. 8. 18 – 23  Luke 6. 36 – 42

5 More Steps to Kick-Start Prayer 1st July 2020

5 More Steps to Kick-Start Prayer 1st July 2020

5 More Steps to Kick-Start Prayer

 

Introduction.

  • Last May (22nd) I published a short paper, ‘5 Steps to Kick-Start Prayer’ which outlined my lack of expertise in prayer but also some hints which help me to persevere. They were basic steps regarding place, time and language. For some they will be vital; for others rather underwhelming. These next 5 steps take us deeper into prayer which we defined as ‘consciously putting ourselves in God’s company’.
  • There are libraries of books on each of these topics. You may have found some treasures among them but if you haven’t, then please ask.  I still have some useful books in my twice-filleted library which I am happy to lend or to make further suggestions.
  • So, 5 more steps which I hope may help you along the path through this tantalizing and infuriating mystery which we call prayer!

 

Step 6: Meditation.

  • The first 5 steps were principally about intercession: a good place to start. The Lord’s Prayer, the model prayer, is concerned mainly with intercession (the coming of kingdom values, the provision of daily necessities). Archbishop William Temple said that when he prayed, coincidences happen. When he doesn’t, they don’t.
  • Contrasted with intercessory prayer, meditation focusses our minds on one thought or situation. Scripture is an obvious focus and the best. Take a phrase which appeals to you and ’brood’ upon it. One French mystic calls the exercise ‘rocking and chewing The Word’, rather like a cow chewing the cud, extracting the juices. For instance, a verse like Luke 12 32: ‘Fear not little flock for it is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the kingdom’.
  • The parables of Jesus are also fruitful ground for mediation. Take Mark 4. 1 – 20: the Parable of the Sower and Jesus’s explanation. Plenty of scope there for brooding, getting inside the story.
  • Another method is to take an event in Jesus’s life such as Luke 5. 17 – 26, the healing of the paralytic. Put yourself in the picture: are you one of the crowd in the house? If so, are you at the front or the back? Are you on the roof, ripping off the tiles or are you on the stretcher, being lowered down on top of the crowd?  How does if feel? Who is near you? What about the atmosphere and lastly, how will you move closer to Jesus from your present position?

 

Step 7: Coping with Frustration.

  • ‘5 Steps’ finished with a reference to the 17th century priest and poet, George Herbert and his poem, ‘Prayer’. I go to poetry when my prayers run dry, and for good reason. Another of Herbert’s poems illustrates his frustration (and mine) in prayer. ‘The Collar’ begins with Herbert thumping the Holy Table in frustration! Many a Christian will have been there! There are several causes of frustration in prayer:
  1. Silence can be frightening to some but is such a vital ingredient in serious prayer. A cork floating on the water seems distracted by the turmoil on the surface but underneath is a whole different world. Elijah feared for his life (1 Kings 19) and found refuge in a cave.  It wasn’t in the wind, the earthquake or fire that he found the voice of God but in the silence. Getting under the surface can be challenging.  Use a repetitive word or phrase or something visual to concentrate upon. However, it is in the silence where the real riches lie.
  2. Boredom is a common problem. Boredom can be brought on by external factors (fatigue, repetition) and can be tempered by a change of location, time or posture). However, internal factors can also irritate us and might suggest a different form of prayer (see Step 8). We all need encouragement to keep going so a prayer partner or guide may be an encouragement to you. Or even the right book.
  3. No answers to prayer? This raises big questions for which there are pointers which don’t fit into this short guide. But many of us this lockdown will have been encouraged by the recovery from illness of key people in our communities for whom we have been praying fervently. Intercessory prayers will have an answer and we may be part of that answer. To assist another person or group with practical help makes the spirit soar and the prayers dance! More on this in Step 9, below.

Step 8: Contemplation.

  • So far we have covered the work of intercession and meditation. Both require verbal or mental language. Intercession ranges around the concerns of the world while meditation concentrates on a phrase or an event in the life of Christ, or even the verse of a hymn. Contemplation requires a shift to wordless adoration and the move can be disturbing.  John of the Cross, one of the Spanish Mystics, coined the phrase, ‘The Dark Night of the Soul’ – a rather frightening phrase which is actually encountered by many on their spiritual journeys.(1)
  • Symptoms that this shift is required include a frustration with meditation, a desire to move away from mental/active prayer and thirdly a desire to be alone with God. We are drawn to be near and in that mystery which, for shorthand, we call God.

When I lived by the sea, I thought that vast ocean was a dead hinterland which I did not

understand and contributed nothing to the life of the parish.  Then I began to understand it, was mesmerised and drawn to it.  It remained a mystery but a friendly one – one which brought peace, comfort and even when it was in a rage, communicated power and majesty.

  • This attraction to wordless adoration is like two lovers wanting to be nowhere else but together. No words are necessary; they know each other’s thoughts and intentions. There is much experience of darkness, cloud and ‘lostness’ but also a continued yearning to be present in that state of lostness for a glimpse of clarity.
  • This form of prayer brings us close to a unity with God but should not be confused with a state of tranquillity alone. Quiet is important as part of the process but all our prayers must issue in action: love of God and our neighbours.

Step 9:  Morality.

  • All our prayers must issue in some form of action on our part. God does answer every prayer but sometimes the signs are obscure. That has always been the case.  Think of the burning bush (Exodus 3) when God propels Moses into leadership; the star above a stable in winter; a silence after the storm; a vision on a hillside, a conversation with a stranger in a graveyard. However, if we’re facing in the wrong direction – away from Christ and his ways – then we will miss those signs. “Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.” (Matthew 5.8).
  • Karl Barth (famous theologian) said, ‘To clasp the hands in prayer is the beginning of an uprising against the disorder of the world’. Prayer does not come under the category of self-fulfilment, happiness or therapy. It is part of the work of building the Kingdom of God which Jesus preached and practised during his ministry. He has given us our ministry, of which quiet prayer is just a part, an orientation towards action.
  • Luke tells us of a most powerful spiritual experience on the top of a mountain: the story of the Transfiguration, Chapter 9. However, “on the next day” (9.37) the disciples were faced with a fitting child whom Jesus heals but he also gave the disciples a sharp telling-off for their lack of action.
  • ‘Hints and guesses’ as T.S.Eliot says, are often all we receive in terms of answers to prayer or prompts towards action. Scripture reading is a backdrop to all of this. It makes God’s truths more sharply defined. And don’t ignore dreams either. They can be powerful incentives. Lift the phone, write a card, raise a smile, volunteer for Foodbank, face that difficult relationship.

Step 10: Church-Going.

  • I have spent much time among the most professional pray-ers in the world: monks and nuns. Their life is one of solitude, silence, aloneness. But each day, at regular intervals, they go to church together for Divine Worship.  Now the internal dynamics of a monastic house are often very powerful.  They did not choose each other; God chose them to live, work and pray together – to love one another though not necessarily to like one another. 
  • Churchgoing for them is a corrective, a re-orientation. It is a crucial part of the day and not an option. Neither is church-going for us an option. It is here that we are fed, encouraged, directed, challenged and valued. It is here that we give value to others by just being there and that is so important in a bleak world which is now looking for a different way to live, post-pandemic.
  • People who pray – and you must be one called to such a ministry, having followed these 10 steps! – find that their work begins and ends in worship. We do not pray alone. We pray with our colleagues around the world – millions at any given moment – but we also join our prayers with those of the saints who have gone before and those who will follow after. The church (building) is a signpost on the way; a marker, a cairn for which our contribution is vital, especially in the countryside where the density of population is low and resources are scarce.
  • Stewardship is not a clever way of raising money but a spiritual thermometer. How much are we prepared to give to God in terms of time, talents and money? Your contributions will grow, along with your commitment and prayer is a lubricant to all of that.
  • Enjoy your prayers. Thank you for reading thus far – and please pray for me.

                                                                                                Christopher Armstrong.

                                                                                                1 July 2020

The Welland-Fosse Benefice: Prayers and Notices.  Sunday 28th June 2020: 

The Welland-Fosse Benefice: Prayers and Notices.  Sunday 28th June 2020: 

The Welland-Fosse Benefice: Prayers and Notices.

 Sunday 28th June 2020:  Trinity III

 

  • Please remember in your prayers those who are sick: Bishop John and his wife and Janette Saunders (all with Coronavirus), Barry Broughton, Graham Robinson, David Bradshaw and Derek Barker.
  • Pray too for the soul of Eileen Denovan to be buried this week.
  • We pray also for all those who put their lives in danger to serve others suffering from Coronavirus and for those who have lost their jobs in the crisis.
  • Why not join us via Zoom for Morning Prayer each day at 8.30am – or Compline on Mondays and Wednesdays at 7.30pm? Sunday worship is at 10am, presenting a service with music and brief address.  Join us in the usual way via Simon’s email address, sialey@aol.com
  • “5 Steps to Kick-start Prayer”?  Go the benefice website: wellandfosse.org
  • Zoom bible studies in St. Mark’s Gospel will begin on Tuesday 7 July at 7.30pm. Please contact Christopher for further details: armstrong60@yahoo.com
  • Our churches are open for private prayer. For details of particular churches, see below.

 

SOUTH LUFFENHAM

Our Church is open every day for private prayer from 10am to 4pm.

Please remember the Rutland Foodbank still needs donations – collection box outside 27 The Street. (Please see below what they need most)

MORCOTT

The church will open for private prayer 10am-4pm each Sunday from 5 July. Sanitiser will be on the Font. Please follow the Instructions that will be posted at the entrance. 

 

TODAY’S MEDITATION

Home schooling must be a nightmare for some families!  Thank goodness I am beyond that.  Socializing our children was bad enough. I can’t imagine trying to teach them physics!  ‘A prophet is not without honour, except in his own country’. There are many things that we cannot give our own family – surgery, dental care perhaps – but teaching is often one of them. Formal teaching anyway. It is a great skill. At the start of the lockdown, Professor Brian Cox remarked about the impossibility of home-schooling his own children.

 

Yet the actions of parents in supporting their children’s education is so important. It adds to the work of the authorized teacher. Those small acts like providing breakfast at the right time, supplying paper, a laptop, encouragement after an hour’s work around the kitchen table.  These all add to the work of the teacher.

 

And so, do those who support the life of faith. It is an extension of God’s work in growing the kingdom here on earth. There is a significant level of commitment involved in brass cleaning, mowing the churchyard, welcoming back the worshipper.  It encourages those who identify closely with the work of Christ and should not be overlooked. Who knows how God works through these simple tasks? I for one find massive encouragement therein.

 

See wellandfosse.org for much more information, including contact details for

The Very Rev Christopher Armstrong and the churchwardens

 

Our shopping list

  • Coffee
  • Dried potato (smash type)
  • Jam
  • Small bags of sugar
  • Tinned potatoes
  • Small sponge puddings
  • UHT Juice
  • Tins of Custard
  • Shaving gel
  • Washing up liquid
  • Non- Bio washing capsules
  • Toilet rolls
TALK FOR SUNDAY 28TH JUNE 2020

TALK FOR SUNDAY 28TH JUNE 2020

Lay Reader Ann Robinson preached the Sermon this Sunday

The reading that we heard from St Matthew’s gospel this morning comes at the end of a chapter where Jesus is setting out the directions for the disciples to go and preach the Kingdom of Heaven, heal the sick and drive out demons. He then goes on to tell them that they will be like “sheep among wolves” and will be persecuted. Hardly an advert for an easy life! Nothing to make you want to sign up! Jesus did not promise an easy life either for the disciples or for us.

But Jesus states that there will be great rewards for even the smallest good action, a drink of water, nothing huge but very necessary and it shows kindness. Here he is speaking of hospitality but not as a one-off as love is not a one-off! Jesus doesn’t give us a script but we speak through the way we show love to those we meet. Mother Teresa of Calcutta was asked how it was that she could continue to tend the sickest and most wretched of the poor in the slums of Calcutta, India. She said that as she looked at each person for whom she was caring she tried to imagine that she was tending the Lord Jesus’ wounded body – His nail-scarred hands, feet, and side. A hard thing to do.!

 When Jesus sent the disciples out, He told them that they were doing God’s work. In Jewish law there was what was known as the principle of Shalia. If a nobleman sent a representative it was as if the man himself was there and should be treated with the respect deserved. Much as ambassadors of other countries are treated here. Any kindness shown to the disciples was shown to Jesus and so to God and likewise the opposite! The disciples were not out to sell themselves but to show the love of God.

The picture given is not one that encourages sign up! The world was and often is a hostile place but in the service of Christ there are no undercover agents and there is no blending in. It calls for active service and to be on the front line. It is not easy and we are often distracted but we can make that journey.

 

Our journey with God can be likened to a labyrinth. A labyrinth is different entirely to a maze. A maze is deliberately confusing whereas a labyrinth is a meandering path to the centre. The pictures on the screen show the labyrinth on the floor of Chartres Cathedral in France It was often used as a symbolic journey to Jerusalem and was walked as a pilgrimage, a journey searching to be nearer God. If you print the diagram out and follow it you will find that there is one way in and out but the path meanders, a questioning and searching journey in the hope of coming nearer to God. Often you are further away from the centre but need to keep going to eventually reach the centre of complete love.

We are all on a pilgrimage, searching for something. Huston Smith in Phil Cousineau’s book “The Art of Pilgrimage” states “The object of a pilgrimage is not rest and relaxation—to get away from it all. To set out on a pilgrimage is to throw down a challenge to everyday life.” That is what we are asked to do as Christians; challenge everything we do and say. Perhaps some of you have watched the series on television about groups of people who travel one of the old pilgrim ways such as the Camino de Santiago, the way of St James. The groups are very disparate, some committed Christians, some of other faiths and some of none. But the effect of the pilgrimage on most of them was amazing and even those who professed atheism were profoundly affected by the faith and holiness encountered. We all have the need to find a deep love beyond ourselves and it is that love which Christ offers each one of us.

But once you have found the love at the centre of your life you have to return to the mundane world and give out that love to everyone you meet. We can’t scare people into the arms of God but we can love them there. Maya Angellou who wrote I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings states: “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did but people will never forget how you made them feel”.

During the last few months during lockdown, I have received incredible kindness often from unexpected sources and I’m sure many of you have found the same. In most cases the actions have not been huge but so necessary to making life easier. Many have commented on the hope that this will continue when we are back to our usual busy lives and that is the responsibility of all of us. Christ needs the saints and those who do great things. But he also needs those who show their love in creating welcoming homes, the hands that care for those many would find unlovely, the hearts that show Christian love. Robert Browning wrote in “Pippa Passes” ‘All service ranks the same with God’. No act done in the name of Christ is too small.

We are all ambassadors for Christ with all that that entails, the hostility which the world can send our way, but the reward is the great love of God which is ours for the accepting. The pilgrimage continues throughout our lives as we move ever nearer our God. Stephen Cottrell once a canon at Peterborough and now Archbishop-elect of York went on the 700km pilgrimage to Santiago and wrote in his book “Striking Out” about his journey:

“Why are you walking, oh why are you walking? What is the reason and where is the way?

To learn how to stop, is the reason I’m walking, the reason I’m leaving, to learn how to stay. Oh why don’t you join me and we’ll walk together, each step a blessing and each road a way.”

 

Let us pray:

Lord, help us to walk in your way, to walk together and to find your peace and love. Amen.